JAMA Motorcycle Market Trend Surveys Fiscal Year 2007 Survey Results

posted Oct 17, 2010, 5:50 AM by Loose Tube   [ updated Jul 26, 2011, 11:42 PM ]

JAMA - April 15, 2008

The Japan Automobile Manufacturers Association (JAMA) has published the results of its motorcycle market trends survey carried out in fiscal 2007. Targeting new-model purchasers and others, JAMA motorcycle surveys are conducted in odd-numbered years to track changes in the motorcycle market.

The latest survey actually consisted of two separate surveys (respectively, a survey of new-model purchasers and a random survey of owners and non-owners/users alike).

Based on 5,057 samples, survey results highlighted the following trends.

(1) Regarding new-model motorcycle purchasers:

  • Motorcycle ownership among young men and women in their late teens declined, whereas ownership among men and women in their 50s or older grew.This confirmed an overall trend towards older owners.
  • Replacement demand accounted for over half (55%) of the total number of purchases. First-time purchases marked a decline since the previous survey conducted in fiscal 2005, while “additional unit purchases” and purchases after a hiatus of non-ownership showed slight increases.
  • Of all survey respondents, 19% had experienced tandem riding on expressways, up from the 12% recorded in 2005.
  • 89% of respondents said they wanted to continue riding motorcycles in future, up from 87% in 2005. As for users’ intentions to become licensed to operate motorcycles in a higher license category, 4%—up from 3% in 2005—of respondents expressed their desire to obtain an “ordinary”-category license in order to operate motorcycles with engine displacement of 51cc to 400cc (in contrast to their current license enabling them to operate 50cc-and-under vehicles only).

(2) Regarding the random survey (whose purpose was to determine the current status of (a) the prohibition on use by persons under 18 years of age, (b) owner/non-owner perceptions of motorcycles, etc., and (c) potential changes in market demand and structure), survey results revealed that

  • Female motorcycle owners valued their motorcycles especially in terms of their “low environmental impact” and “convenience as a mode of transport,” whereas male owners valued their motorcycles primarily as a “pleasurable hobby.” Meanwhile, a large number of non-users associated motorcycles primarily with their “convenience as a mode of transport.”
  • The unavailability of motorcycle parking bays in the greater Tokyo region was particularly acute “in front of train stations” and in “busy commercial/shopping areas.”
  • Motorcycle owners in their late teens and in their 40s indicated an intention to increase their “motorcycle purchasing expenditures” in future.

Reference: JAMA’s Fiscal 2007 Motorcycle Market Trends Survey ~ Summary of Results

1. Survey Purpose and Frequency

This survey is conducted by JAMA in odd-numbered years to track changes in the motorcycle market.

2. Basic Description of the Fiscal 2007 Survey

The 2007 survey actually consisted of two separate surveys, indicated here as (1) and (2), with (1) being a survey of purchasers of new motorcycles and (2) being a random survey including motorcycle owners as well as non-owners.

Survey targets(1) New-model purchasers(2) M/F, aged 15-79
Survey areaNationwideNationwide (200 locations)
Valid responses5,057 (45.9% response rate)1,200
Survey periodAugust-September 2007August 2007

3. Survey Results

Survey of New-Model Purchasers:

  • New-model purchases by young men in their late teens and 20s showed a steady decline. While the same trend was recorded for young women in their late teens, purchases by women in their 20s grew by 1% compared to the results of the previous survey conducted in 2005.
  • Replacement demand accounted for over half (55%) of the total number of purchases, while first-time purchases, at 18%, marked a decline. In contrast, purchases after a hiatus of non-ownership, at 15%, and “additional unit purchases,” at 11%, showed slight increases.
  • In terms of purchasing criteria, the leading criteria were “style and design,” “fuel efficiency performance” and “easy handling,” in that order.
  • Intended motorcycle uses were primarily “commuting to work or school,” at 48%, and “shopping and errands,” at 30%. Nevertheless, motorcycle use for “commuting to work or school” showed a declining trend, while use for “shopping and errands” increased.
  • Average monthly mileage was 254 km, down from 270 km in 2005.
  • A large majority—89%--of respondents said they wanted to continue riding motorcycles in future, up from 87% in 2005.
  • Among owners who wanted to continue riding motorcycles, over 40% said they would stop doing so if parking space were no longer available, or if their financial situation made it difficult to continue riding.

Random Survey—Owner/Non-Owner Perceptions:

  • Survey results confirmed that the prohibition on motorcycle use by persons under the age of 18 is being respected.
  • Survey results further confirmed that the unavailability of motorcycle parking bays in the greater Tokyo region was especially acute “in front of train stations” and in “busy commercial/shopping areas”—a fact that impedes the use of motorcycles as a convenient means of transport for commuting to work or school or for getting around town.
  • Non-owner respondents’ perceptions of motorcycles were largely neutral (“can’t say whether good or poor”). However, many male respondents in their late teens and 20s indicated they had a “positive impression.”
  • The positive perceptions most frequently expressed by non-owners included “convenient and practical” and “easy to use,” while negative perceptions focused on the potential dangers involved in motorcycle riding.
  • Non-owners with positive perceptions formed their views mostly on the basis of motorcycle coverage by the mass media.
  • The majority of non-owner young respondents, both male and female, who showed a strong interest in motorcycles indicated that they “plan[ned] on making a motorcycle purchase” and/or “want[ed] to purchase a motorcycle at some point.”

Random Survey—Future Demand Trends:

  • Motorcycle owners in their late teens and in their 40s indicated an intention to increase fairly significantly their “motorcycle purchasing expenditures” in future.
  • As for their anticipated frequency of motorcycle use five years from now, male owners in their early 40s and women owners in their late 30s and 40s indicated “increased” use. While all age groups foresaw less frequent motorcycle use ten years hence, men in their late 30s and early 40s and women in their late 30s anticipated a less steep decline in use than the other age groups.
  • Motorcycle use for “commuting to work or school” was expected to decline in five and ten years. On the other hand, increased use as a “hobby/sports activity” and for “leisure riding” and “touring” was anticipated by men, while greater use for “shopping and errands” was anticipated by women.
  • The convenience factor (“greater flexibility of use,” “easier mobility” than that provided by public transport) was seen by owner respondents to be the greatest anticipated merit of motorcycle use five and ten years down the road.
  • In terms of the value that owners/users demand from motorcycles, male respondents most commonly cited “manufacturers and brands” while female respondents emphasized the “instant mobility” provided by motorcycles.
  • Determining factors cited by motorcycle owners for their motorcycle purchasing choice were “compact size” and “easy handling” for scooter models; “quick start-up and acceleration” and “engine type” for on-road sports models; and “durability” and “lightweight body” for both off-road sports models and commercial/business-use models.

    See the original article in full at 
    http://www.jama-english.jp/release/release/2008/080415-2.html
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